Sunday, November 17, 2013

Majestic" Yellowstone National Park



Majestic" a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr. Yellowstone National Park During the late summer breeding season the bugling of bull elk echoes through the mountains. These powerful animals strip the velvet off their new antlers using them in violent clashes that determine who gets to mate with whom. Males with the bigger antlers, typically older animals, usually win these battles and dominate small herds.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Pete " A pink water-lily

Pete ©ChelseaStark http://www.chelseastarkphotography by chelseastarkphotography.com
Pete , a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr.Via Flickr:The Hairy water lily or Pink water-lily (Nymphaea pubescens) is a species of water ... The hairy water lily is found both as a cultivated plant as well as in the wild.

Monday, October 14, 2013

The dance of the peacock


"peacock" ©ChelseaStark http://www.chelseastarkphotography.com by chelseastarkphotography.com
"peacock" , a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr.Via Flickr:The peacock is first mentioned in the Bible in the time of Solomon. He used to send his vessels to distant countries, and they came back once in three years, "bringing gold, and silver, and ivory, and apes, and peacocks." Solomon was the richest among all the kings that the Bible tells us about. When he first became king God spoke to him in a dream, and told him to ask for any thing he wished. If God should speak so to you, what would you ask for?
Solomon did not pray that God would make him rich, or that he would give him health, or let him live a great many years on the earth; but he said, "I am a little child, I know not how to go out or come in. Give therefore thy servant an understanding heart." Then God was pleased with what he asked, and besides giving him great wisdom, he gave him also riches and honor. He had forty thousand horses, and silver and gold in abundance. All the vessels used in his house were of gold, because silver was not good enough; it was "as stones" for plenty, and was "nothing accounted of in the days of Solomon." In the second chapter of Ecclesiastes, Solomon himself speaks of his riches, and after telling us of some of his treasures, he says: "Whatsoever my eyes desired I kept not from them; I withheld not my heart from any joy." Perhaps you think he must have been perfectly happy, if any man in this world ever was; but what does he say? "All is vanity and vexation of spirit." This does not sound much like being contented. No, dear child, these are not the things that make us happy; nothing but the true love of God in the heart can do this.
There are many peacocks in India, and large flocks of them are sometimes seen around the temples; they also live among the bushes near the banks of rivers. They sometimes rest on high trees, but always make their nests on the ground, under the shrubs.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Marmot " A Yellow-bellied marmot


Marmot ©ChelseaStark http://www.chelseastarkphotography.com by chelseastarkphotography.com
Marmot , a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr.
Via Flickr:
Yellow-bellied marmots generally live in moderately warm, dry habitats at low to mid elevations. They are found in many different habitats, including semi-desert, woodland and forest openings, and the alpine zone. Those that live further south live at higher elevations. For example, in the White Mountains of California they are found only above 2000 m. Moreover, because of absence from valleys, southern populations are isolated from one other, forming isolated populations. It can be inferred that the presence of hoary marmots inhibit the distribution of yellow-bellied marmots in certain high elevation areas, as both occupy subalpine and alpine areas. Yellow-bellied marmots inhabit vegetated fortified slopes or rock outcrops in meadows, which serve as support for the burrows that they reside in, as well as sunning and observation posts. The main entrance of burrow, which they dig themselves, is usually about 0.6 m deep into the ground, and extends about 3.8 to 4.4 m horizontally into the hillside. Many short tunnels branch from main passageway, sometimes connecting to other burrows. Burrows stay relatively stable and thus serve as preferable places to raise young, hibernate, and hide from potential predators.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Standing alone Yellow. water lily


Standing alone, a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr. The Yellow Water-lily is an aquatLic plant of the family Nymphaeaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe, northwest Africa, and western Asia.


Thursday, August 1, 2013

Chip off the old bloc Yellowstone National Park Chelsea Stark www.chelseastarkphotography.com

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Chip off the old block, a photo by Chelsea A Stark on Flickr. Yellowstone National Park
Chipmunks may be classified either as a single genus, Tamias (Greek: ταμίας), or as three genera: Tamias, which includes the eastern chipmunk; Eutamias, which includes the Siberian chipmunk; and Neotamias, which includes the 23 remaining, mostly western, species. These classifications are arbitrary, and most taxonomies over the twentieth century have placed the chipmunks in a single genus. However, studies of mitochondrial DNA show that the divergence between each of the three chipmunk groups is comparable to the genetic dissimilarity between Marmota and Spermophilus.


Thursday, July 18, 2013

GreyOwl" Grand Teton National Park- Chelsea Stark http;www.chelseastarkphotography.com



GreyOwl2" Grand Teton National Park a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr.Via Flickr:Owlets begin growing their primary feathers (main, adult feathers) at 3 weeks of age. They have light yellow eyes with blue pupils. Less brooding is necessary and they are very active about the nest. Owlets learn to eject excrement (body waste) over the side of the nest but sometimes fall due to their clumsiness. About this time the owlets begin using a defensive display when disturbed. They raise their feathers, fan their wings downward, and hiss or snap their bill. After 5-6 weeks, the female coaxes the owlets out of the nest by offering food from a nearby branch. At about 9-10 weeks old the owlets first flight out of the nest to the ground. They quickly scramble up a tree to get away from ground level predators. If approached by a predator, they assume a hiding pose by sitting still and erect against the side of the tree. If this pose fails they present the defensive display. Feedings become irregular but the young owlets remain with the female and beg for food until September or October. During mid-June, the young owlets use their inborn instinct to attack prey. Young owls leave their parent's home range in autumn, when they are fully independent and can find their own hunting territory.When a member of the pair dies, the survivor remains in the home territory until another mate arrives.Owls defend their territories from other owls. Defense occurs during breeding times. It lasts from 1 month before breeding until the young owlets leave the parental territory. Adults may wander across territory lines for a short time before the next breeding season begins. They frequently allow other types of birds such as hawks to live in their territory.Owls with large territories frequently spend each season in a different part of their territory. Owls use specific areas of their territory for nesting and roosting. Some birds use certain trees so regularly that observers can predict in which trees they will find the owl in during a specific season.During the winter and fall, owls prefer evergreen roost trees since they provide daytime cover. When these are not available, owls will adapt to any place that provides as much concealment as possible during daylight hours. They seem to prefer to roost in isolated trees in small forest openings.

Thursday, July 11, 2013

GreyOwl2" Grand Teton NationalPark-Chelsea Stark http://www.chelseastarkphotography.com


GreyOwl" Grand Teton National Park a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on 

Fickr.Via Flickr:Owlets begin growing their primary feathers (main, adult feathers) at 3 weeks of age. They have light yellow eyes with blue pupils. Less brooding is necessary and they are very active about the nest. Owlets learn to eject excrement (body waste) over the side of the nest but sometimes fall due to their clumsiness. About this time the owlets begin using a defensive display when disturbed. They raise their feathers, fan their wings downward, and hiss or snap their bill. After 5-6 weeks, the female coaxes the owlets out of the nest by offering food from a nearby branch. At about 9-10 weeks old the owlets first flight out of the nest to the ground. They quickly scramble up a tree to get away from ground level predators. If approached by a predator, they assume a hiding pose by sitting still and erect against the side of the tree. If this pose fails they present the defensive display. Feedings become irregular but the young owlets remain with the female and beg for food until September or October. During mid-June, the young owlets use their inborn instinct to attack prey. Young owls leave their parent's home range in autumn, when they are fully independent and can find their own hunting territory.When a member of the pair dies, the survivor remains in the home territory until another mate arrives.Owls defend their territories from other owls. Defense occurs during breeding times. It lasts from 1 month before breeding until the young owlets leave the parental territory. Adults may wander across territory lines for a short time before the next breeding season begins. They frequently allow other types of birds such as hawks to live in their territory.Owls with large territories frequently spend each season in a different part of their territory. Owls use specific areas of their territory for nesting and roosting. Some birds use certain trees so regularly that observers can predict in which trees they will find the owl in during a specific season.During the winter and fall, owls prefer evergreen roost trees since they provide daytime cover. When these are not available, owls will adapt to any place that provides as much concealment as possible during daylight hours. They seem to prefer to roost in isolated trees in small forest openings.